“The Muslims I Know”, An Invitation to Dialog

In “The Muslims I  Know“, Mara  introduces you to members of the community who whose lives in this country are in so many ways, little different from our own.   They enjoy the same parks and restaurants, attend the same schools and work in the same offiices.   More than that, they have the same hopes and fears, the same aspirations, and experience the same joys and sorrows.   But, they are people who chose to come to this country, and to stay, and to raise their families here.  These are the people who chose to be Americans.

In “The Muslims I Know”, Mara  engages each member of her entourage of Muslim Americans and their friends and neighbors to introduce him or herself and tell or show us something of their lives here and now,  intertwining their stories and familiar images of the local community with images of her birthplace,  Lahore Pakistan, and the culture in which she has her roots.

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Rochester Free Radio and My Interview on the Broken Spear Vision

Rochester Free Radio has been airing the internet at RochesterFreeRadio.com  where they loop  scheduled programming daily.  In a week or two Rochester Free Radio will be going live on the air as WRFZ-LP at 106.3 FM.    This is very exciting!    Rochester will finally have a real community radio station.  In the meantime, George Payne has been interviewing local activists on The Broken Spear Vision, which is a regular component of  WRFZ programming.  I have been interviewed on The Broken Spear Vision a number of times, most recently last Sunday.

You can hear my interview on the player below:

If you like what you hear, I am archiving episodes of The Broken Spear Vision.  Click here or click the Broken Spear Vision Tab above.   And tune into Rochester Free Radio for more great shows.

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Testimony From the Heart

A guest post by Roland Micklem, initially published in the Scrap Paper #407.

The year was 1942. We had been at war with Japan and Germany for a few months, and every red-blooded American male was itching for a piece of the action.

I was a puny, underage 14 year-old, my first year in high school, but like all of my classmates and teachers, I was literally bubbling over with zeal for the Allied cause. Songs like You’re a Sap, Mister Jap and In Th’ Fuhrer’s Face were making the rounds, and our school—and indeed the entire nation—was awash in waves of patriotic furor.

Against this backdrop of such unabated Americanism, the school authorities engaged a speaker to address an assembly of the student body. The speaker was a woman who had spent many years in Japan, and she was there to tell us about the Japanese people.

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