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Basic Syria Information

Below are some links that lead to some articles with basic Syria facts.   Some of these writers, even after undermining much of the US propaganda on Syria, repeat harsh and biased western judgements as if it is just too dangerous to step entirely outside the Political ‘consensus’.  But, I trust my readers to separate factual presentations from the kind of reflexive judgements that keep one within the bounds of ‘mainstream analysis’ and are the foundation of the US drive for the destruction of the Syrian Republic.  Others stand proudly outside the Washington consensus.

 

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Syrian Internal Security Forces are sworn in during their graduation ceremony, at Ain Issa desert base, in Raqqa province, northeast Syria, Thursday, July 20, 2017. Some 250 residents of Syria's Raqqa province are the latest batch to graduate from a brief U.S-training course that is preparing an internal security force to hold and secure areas as they are captured from Islamic State militants. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

Increasing US Aggression in Syria Leads to Chaos

All the news today is about Turkey attacking Afrin, a Kurdish governed city in northern Syria and threatening another Kurdish run city named Manbj. This is a very dangerous situation and another devastating assault on the Syrian people who have already suffered so much from a war that that was started by foreign manipulation and fed by foreign fighters, foreign […]

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A Bitter Pill

A Twitter chain by Ehsani.   Ehsani is a Syrian American banker from Aleppo.   He has written for  Joshua Landis’ Syria Comment blog and, if I remember correctly, was editor of that blog for a while beginning some time in 2011.    Ehsani,  posts some of the most authentic and enlightening twitter chains on current conditions in Syria.  They are the […]

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‘Sweden’s Failed Immigration’ Racist, Naval Gazing

A friend circulated the video below, a ‘Swedish Documentary On Failed Immigration‘,  with some enthusiasm.  I was interested at the time because I had met people in Iraqi Kurdistan who have relatives living in Sweden who appear to have become very well integrated into Swedish society.   However, I do not recommend it, and since I think the film is relevant to some of the ‘concerns’ raised about immigrants in this country, I decided to publish my critique of the film here.

The film begins with a series of questions.  They ask whether it would be cheaper to help refugees by allowing them to stay in their own countries and ending the Western supported wars that are driving them out.   In fact, this is what the majority of refugees would prefer, but the film is not concerned with the preferences of the refugees.   They also ask why there is a preponderance of men among the refugees arriving in Sweden.  This isn’t surprising as a single man can surely travel more efficiently than a woman with  children.   But they don’t ask how they could change this balance through providing more assistance to women and children in war zones.  Their concern is that these refugees, strangers to Sweden, mostly Arab men,  have been given permanent residency in their country.

What really jumped out was this message that Swedish culture is threatened and that Swedes are not allowed to question their countries reception of these immigrants, much less empowered to do anything about it.   The film asserts a concern that the majority of white Europeans (Swedes) in Sweden will soon be lost. In the United States there are those that express similar concerns that the US will soon be a majority black and brown country, which I don’t see happening any time soon here.   But about Sweden, the numbers given in the film itself reduce these  claims to absurdity.

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Off the Radar

There are a few events in US foreign policy that have not been covered in US Mainstream Media or have not been highlighted in their true context.   So, I’ll briefly list them below.

US Weapons going into Syria.

Dilyana Gaydhzandiev first wrote about the Silk Ways transport of weapons out of Bulgaria to the Middle East and North Africa with US military contractors involved.  The flights are under diplomatic immunity so their cargo is not inspected, and they generally make unscheduled stops to unload in secret.  . . .

Drone Strikes Have Doubled since Trump Presidency

Drone strikes have doubled since Trump came to power.  His recent  threat to refurbish the Afghan War and expand it into Pakistan is related to this increase in Drone strikes, most of which are in that region.   The news of civilian Drone strike victims is itself a victim of the new bipartisan, across the board censorship of media. . .

The Current Heroin Crisis Originates in the Afghan War

There is a huge heroin crisis in the US and globally as well.   Young people are more likely to die of a heroin overdose than of a disease.   When the US went to war with Afghanistan their opium imports were negligible.  . . .

In South America, US Proxies are Rolling Back the Gains of Popular Socialist Governments

In Brazil, President Dilma Rousseff was impeached and dismissed by a cabal of corrupt opposition politicians on the basis that she allowed some corruption to occur during her Presidency.   Lula, the most popular President Brazil has ever had, decided to run in the next election.   He has now been convicted corruption in a kangaroo court and sentenced to 16 years in prison.

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Syrian Victory, the Last Gate

According to an interview by Kevork Almassian of Syriana Analysis with Lebaese reporter Marwa Osman, the SAA and their allies have now restored sovereignty to 85% of Syria,   This is a hard won victory, and worth celebrating.    The liberation of the great cities of Syria along with much of the countryside is a testament to the patriotism and loyalty of the  Syrian people and to the stability and persistence of their government, a government that embraced change and development under the most dire circumstances, inviting the disenfranchised to speak. reflecting their concerns in a new constitution and making reconciliation an operational resource to restore unity to the country in the midst of a horrific war.

Since the liberation of East Aleppo, the Syrian government allied forces have stabilized one area after another in the heavily populated western region of the country, and finally, after the liberation of East Aleppo, crossed the desert to the eastern cities long occupied by ISIS.   But their victory has brought the real enemy to the foreground.

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SubRosa Weapons for Terrorists

by Dilyana Gaytandzhieva, who lost her job when Al Jazeera picked up her article and referenced the information she had researched.  I’m archiving the article here as a PDF so that it won’t be disappeared along with it’s author, from the public domain.   The scheme Dilyana discovered  has some of the flavor of the post-9/11 rendition program.     Illegal flights are diverted from their normal course and used to deliver politically sensitive cargo to war zones.   Eastern Europe is a pivotal region for these kinds of activities along with US allies in West Asia between the southern part of Russia and Iran.    Click more to view the PDF –

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Looking to Syria’s Future

Bashar Assad speaking on August 20, 2017 on the corruption of the West and looking East for Syria’s future.   The video is subtitled, and  there is  transcript included in the original post by Sayed Hasan. As he came to power, Bashar Assad was somewhat impressed by Western culture and the possibilities opened by attempting to rejoin the ‘International Community’ led […]

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Forgetting the Drone Wars

n Pakistan in October of 2012, my group of peace activists met Malik Jalal, who spoke to us about the effect of drones on his community in Waziristan and later accompanied our caravan up to Tank, a town on the edge of Waziristan, where we joined a lively anti-war rally.    I specifically remember Malik Jalal as a handsome man in the prime of life, accustomed to having authority.   He had a full beard and wore the garb of a Tribal leader, and spoke about the suffering of his people living under drones.  There was humor in his expression and I remember that he laughed and his eyes twinkled when members of our delegation told of being arrested for sitting outside a military base demanding an end to drone wars.    Only in response to a direct question did he talk about his own experience.   He said that he sometimes slept in the mountains so as not to put his family at risk.

Last summer, in 2016, saw a photo of a man visiting London to share his experience with living under drones and demand that the drones stop flying over Waziristan.  His name was Malik Jalal.    I thought I recognized the man I had met in Pakistan, but an organizer with my group dismissed the possibility out of hand.   I waited a little, then went to my photos and took out a photo to compare with the one in the British news article. **   I was then certain it was the same man.

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